Eggplant and Walnut Ravioli in Tomato-Pesto Sauce

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For Filling:
1 large eggplant, peeled and cut crosswise into slices 1/2 inch thick
1/4 cup walnuts, finely chopped
1 cup ricotta cheese
1/4 cup freshly grated good-quality Parmesan cheese
4 teaspoons minced fresh parsley
2 tablespoons minced fresh basil
1 tablespoon minced fresh sage
1 recipe basic egg pasta dough or 3/4 lb purchased thin fresh pasta sheets
For Pesto:
1/2 cup firmly packed fresh basil leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons pine nuts
1 teaspoon finely chopped walnuts
1 clove garlic
3 tablespoons freshly grated Italian Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
3/4 cup quick tomato sauce
1 wedge, 2 oz Italian Parmesan cheesee
Basic Egg Pasta:
2 cups all-purpose flour, or as needed
4 large eggs, plus beaten egg as needed

For Filling: Preheat a broiler or a grill. Arrange the eggplant slices on a rack in a broiler pan and broil (grill) until lightly browned, 3-4 minutes. Turn the slices over and broil (grill) on the second side until lightly browned and tender, 2-3 minutes.

Transfer the eggplant to a cutting board and cut into small pieces; you should have about 1 cup. Place on kitchen towels to drain off any excess liquid and let cool.

In a food processor fitted with the metal blade or in a blender, combine the eggplant, walnuts and 1/4 cup of the ricotta cheese and purée until smooth. Transfer to a bowl and add the remaining ricotta and Parmesan cheeses, parsley, basil and sage and stir until blended. Cover and refrigerate for at least a few hours or for up to 1 day before using. Just before using, season to taste with salt and white pepper.

Meanwhile, make the basic pasta dough, if using. Cover and let rest for 1 hour as directed, then roll out the dough 1/8 inch thick.

Using a cookie cutter 2 1/2 inches in diameter, cut out 64 disks from the fresh or purchased pasta sheets. Cover the disks with a damp kitchen towel to prevent drying; reserve any remaining pasta for another use. Place 1 teaspoon filling in the center of a disk, brush the edges of the disk with a little water, and top with a second disk. Gently press the edges together, sealing well. Place in a single layer on a rack until slightly dry to the touch, 1-2 hours.

For Pesto: In a food processor fitted with the metal blade, purée the basil, pine nuts, walnuts and garlic. Add the cheese and blend well. With the processor on, pour in the oil in a steady stream until thick. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Fill a deep pot three-fourths full with salted water and bring to a rolling boil. Add the ravioli all at once. Gently stir to prevent sticking. Boil until al dente, 3-4 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a large frying pan over medium heat, melt the butter and stir in the tomato sauce. Just before the ravioli are done, stir in the reserved pesto sauce.

Drain the ravioli briefly in a colander and immediately add to the sauce. Stir gently to coat and arrange on warmed individual plates.

Using a small, sharp knife or a vegetable peeler, shave thin slices from the Parmesan wedge and sprinkle over the ravioli. Serve at once.

Basic Egg Pasta: To mix the basic egg pasta by hand, on a clean work surface, place the 2 cups flour in a mound. Make a well in the center and add the 4 eggs to the well. Using a fork, beat the eggs, gradually incorporating small amounts of the flour from the interior wall of the well into the eggs. Working in a circular pattern, continue to incorporate flour, being careful to maintain the wall of flour so the eggs do not run over the edge.

Work the flour into the eggs until a smooth dough forms. Depending on the humidity, a little less or a little more flour may be needed. If less flour is needed, simply don't incorporate all of it; if more is needed, sprinkle a little on top of the dough and knead it in.

On a clean surface, knead the dough until smooth, velvety and elastic, 1-2 minutes. Cover with a bowl to prevent drying and let the dough relax for 1 hour before rolling it out.

To mix the basic egg pasta in a food processor, place the 2 cups flour in a food processor fitted with the metal blade. In a bowl, lightly whisk the eggs just until blended. Turn on the food processor to aerate the flour briefly, then pour in the eggs. Continue to process for a few seconds until the dough can be pressed into a ball. If the dough is too dry, add beaten egg, 1 teaspoon at a time, and pulse until the correct consistency is achieved. If too moist, add flour, 2 tablespoons at a time, and pulse. Remove the dough from the processor and knead briefly until the surface is smooth, velvety and elastic, 1-2 minutes. Cover with a bowl to prevent drying and let the dough relax for 1 hour before rolling it out.

Use the pasta dough immediately, or wrap airtight and refrigerate for up to 2 days. Before using, unwrap the dough, cover with a bowl to prevent drying and bring to room temperature.

ROLLING AND CUTTING THE DOUGH:

To roll out and cut the dough with a pasta machine, cut the dough in half or thirds. Cover unused dough with a bowl to prevent drying. Set the pasta machine rollers to their widest opening (number 1 on most machines) and feed one portion of the dough through the rollers. Roll through once, fold the dough crosswise into thirds, turn it a quarter turn and roll through again. Then roll the sheet through one more time to strengthen the dough. Set the rollers to the next smaller opening and roll the dough through once. Continue in this manner, progressively setting the rollers to the next smaller opening and rolling the dough through once. On the first, third and fifth settings (numbers 1, 3 and 5), roll through twice to strengthen the dough. Roll out the dough to a thickness of 1/8 or 1/16 inch (3 mm or 2 mm), the second-to-last and last settings on most machines, as specified.

If the dough ripples, too much dough is being pushed through the rollers or the dough isn't relaxed enough to be stretched. Cover the pasta sheet and allow it to relax for a few minutes, then return to the previous setting and roll through. If the dough repeatedly breaks, the gluten must be developed more. Knead the dough by hand and let it relax as before, then begin the rolling again.

For flat cuts such as pappardelle and tagliatelle, place the pasta sheet on a lightly floured board and let dry a little for easier cutting (15-20 minutes) while you roll out the remaining dough. Then adjust the blades to the desired width as directed in individual recipes and pass the sheets through the cutters. Gently separate the pasta strands and gather loosely into small piles. Let dry for 1 hour. Meanwhile, cut the remaining pasta sheets.


To roll out and cut the dough by hand, divide the dough in half or thirds. Cover unused dough with a bowl to prevent drying. On a lightly floured board, roll out one portion of the dough 1/8-1/16-inch (3-2-mm) thick, or as specified in each recipe.

For flat cuts such as pappardelle and tagliatelle, place the pasta sheet on a lightly floured board; let dry a little for easy cutting (15-20 minutes) while you roll out the remaining dough. Using 1 pasta sheet at a time and beginning at a long end, loosely roll up the dough, making folds every 2 1/2 inches (6 cm). Cut the roll crosswise into slices the width of pasta specified in each recipe. Gently separate the pasta strands and gather loosely into small piles. Let dry for 1 hour. Meanwhile, cut the remaining pasta sheets.

For filled pasta, use the pasta sheets made by either the machine or hand method immediately to prevent drying, filling and cutting the pasta dough as directed in individual recipes.


Comments:

Dear sir: i am looking for walnut cutting machine by laser i waiting for your reply Thanks & Best Regard ABDUL 00971503553767
abdull, Dubai U.A.E


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